Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein (New York, 1923 – 1997) was one of the main artists of American pop art.
Inspired by newspaper prints and comics, in particular those with the typographical screen (a printing system with characteristic polka dots, which vary the colour) which characterizes his works, the artist intended to recreate a personal vision of reality, reusing the printing processes in his art. Not just prints: after his great success in the early Sixties he will continue to produce works reaching over 5,000 paintings, prints and also sculptures and murals.
In 1961 he began to develop works by mixing cartoon figures with abstract backgrounds with works such as Look Mickey or Popeye, thus giving rise to elements that would characterize Pop Art, such as the idea of ​​making fun of the culture that surrounds us, and extrapolating images from their contexts to underline their real aspects.
These works reached Ivan Karp, director of the Leo Castelli gallery at the time. Castelli was New York's leading contemporary art dealer. Karp was immediately attracted to Lichtenstein's works, and after some reflection Castelli chose to represent Roy. The first exhibition was from February 10 to March 3, 1962, bringing Lichtenstein's comic paintings to the general public: the exhibition sold out, making him famous.